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Posts Tagged ‘vocal cord paresis’

More and more phone calls and e-mails we are getting from people who have undergone related or non-related surgeries and who’s vocal cords and other parts of the vocal anatomy got damaged in the process. Recently, we had a few clients who had undergone thyroid removal (thyroidectomy) and all of them ended up with one of their vocal cords being paralyzed (vocal cord paresis).

damaged-voice

One of our former clients who’s voice I fixed previously, but who (unfortunately, by not following the assigned protocol) ended up with having her papilloma growing, had been convinced by her ENT specialist to undergo not one, but two vocal surgeries. In the end, she ended up with what is called Sulcus Vocalis (vocal gap) and, thankfully, (just mild) Muscle Tension Dysphonia.

And lastly, a few hours ago, we got an e-mail from a professional person who recently undergone a biopsy procedure for her lung disorder. After the obvious intubation, she ended up with a very breathy, unclear and lower positioned voice. She told us that she read our blogs on Vocal Cord Paresis and felt that she now possesses very similar symptoms to what we have described in our publications.

The other day, I got her on the phone and could hardly make out what she was trying to convey to me.

This is a direct quote from her e-mail to us earlier today:
“I may as well end my life as without my voice I am nothing”

How sad is that?

Sad indeed!

Previously, she wrote that she wakes up with hope every morning that her voice is back to its normal state. Unfortunately though, by itself, it is not going to happen!

We however, with absolute certainty, can declare that WE CAN MAKE IT HAPPEN!

Nevertheless, to rectify the serious voice damage, may take up to 50 hours of our unique voice instruction coupled with the finest herbal and homeopathic remedies to be applied on the wounded and disturbed throat flora.

The above aforementioned remedies will work best when the pressure of the sound is removed from the vocal anatomy. To do so, the one’s voice has to be restructured and practically re-channeled to the set of their facial muscles (sinus cavities). Those facial muscles will play the role of the natural resonator or amplifier for that matter.

However, the whole new vocal mechanism will work in its fullest capacity only when the abdominal muscles will be simultaneously engaged to work with the facial muscles in order to assure the support of the height of the lifted sound as well as the width (the body) of the sound. In this junction, the vocal anatomy would be put to “rest” and thus the healing will begin.

So the mechanics of voice and its application, will be healed, strengthened and reestablished. And, as a result, the vocal anatomy will become sound again!

Thus the mission of Non-SurgicalVoice Repair is accomplished.

In other words: YOUR better voice tomorrow, starts with US today!

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